Who’s Invited to What?

A Breakdown of Wedding Events and Who to Invite

For those newly engaged and planning nuptials for the first time – it can be tough to know the proper wedding etiquette. You’ll want to know for sure how much you have in your budget so you can plan properly when creating guest lists. Once you make your wedding guest list, you can’t invite everyone on that list to all the wedding events. From invites to toasts, here’s a breakdown of all the wedding events leading up to the big day and most importantly – who to invite for what event.

 

Engagement Party

Who plans it: One set of parents will host

When does it take place: 1-3 months after your engagement

An engagement fête is a celebration in yours and your fiancé’s honor so normally, you won’t have to do the majority of the planning. Be sure to invite family members on both sides, close friends, grandparents, closest aunts, uncles, cousins, and the bridal party. Although you might want to invite your entire wedding guest list, you’ll want to give your engagement party a completely different feel from your actual wedding. And if you’re not inviting someone to your wedding, do not invite them to any of your pre-wedding events. Here’s a guide to proper engagement party etiquette.

 

Bachelor/Bachelorette Party

Who plans it: The wedding party

When does it take place: It’s up to you! 2 months – 1 week before wedding day

One last wild night! Your bridal party will most likely plan this fun excursion. You just have to decide who to invite! Be sure to spend time on the guest list, which usually includes the bride’s closest friends. You should always extend an invite for any sisters of the bride and groom even if they’re not in the wedding party. Don’t forget about out-of-town friends too! Even if they can’t make it, they’ll appreciate the thought.

Rehearsal Dinner

Who plans it: The couple or traditionally the groom’s parents

When does it take place: The day before the wedding

If you’re footing the bill for your wedding, you and your future spouse have complete control over who to invite. This is the perfect time to practice before your big day so it’s important to invite those who will play a role on your wedding day. This means anyone who is doing a reading, the ushers, and/or your officiant. The immediate family should always be invited to this intimate event. That also includes any parents, siblings, and grandparents. Depending on the size of your family, it should be the perfect amount of guests.

 

Morning-After Brunch

Who plans it: Bride and groom, wedding planner

When does it take place: Morning after your wedding

If the wedding isn’t a solo event, but a weekend’s worth of celebrations, you’ll need to cater to your guests. Why end the celebrating at the reception? Keep the party going and  host a Sunday morning-after brunch. Proper etiquette is to invite your entire wedding guest list as it’s a part of the inclusive weekend. Not everyone will come, but they should all be invited nonetheless. You’ll get to spend another day with your guests, especially those who you don’t get to see all that often. Host a breakfast at the hotel you’re staying at and have everyone enjoy pancakes, waffles, bacon, eggs, coffee, bloody marys, and mimosas together.

Planning all of these wedding related events can be a blast, and a way to get you and your guests excited about the big day. But it’s no secret that the cost of these events are going to start to add up, especially when you’ll still have an entire wedding ceremony and reception to pay for on top of it all. Look into alternative options to finance these events such as a personal loan. At the end of the day, invite your family members and true friends that you know will make your day extra special. Don’t feel obligated to send out invites to everyone. When it comes down to it, have respect and consideration for your guests.

This entry was posted on Wednesday, May 2nd, 2018 at 12:35 pm. Both comments and pings are currently closed.

Comments are closed.